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Author: gschoppe

Benchmarking Gutenberg

As the release of WordPress 5.0 comes closer, I was curious about performance of sites running Gutenberg (the proposed replacement for the WordPress post editor). To answer the question, I wrote a lightweight benchmarking mu-plugin, that I’ll write more about in a future post, once I’ve given it a little more polish.

As a test, I generated two identical pages, one with the Gutenberg editor, and the other with the Gutenberg plugin disabled, and ran my benchmarking script on each.

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2018 is the year I learn JavaScript

I have a confession to make. I don’t really know JavaScript. Some of you, who know my plugins, like WP SmartCrop, Blockade, and WP jSlabify, might say “But that’s some pretty heavy JavaScript!”, but that is where things get complicated. You see, I know math, I know programming, and I know the DOM, inside and out. By knowing those things really well, and treating JavaScript like any other language, I can make pretty cool things! But that’s not the same as knowing JavaScript anymore.

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Search by Location with WP Query

I get a lot of client requests for “Store Locators” or “Location Finders”. There are some plugins like MapPress and WP Store Locator that work well for simple Location Searches, but as soon as the client has requests for specific functionality or designs, these pre-made options start to fall short, and you end up spending more time fighting their code than writing your own. read more »

Improving the WordPress Template Hierarchy

For the most part, the file-structure of WordPress themes is pretty logical, however, there are aspects which keep bothering me about the Template Hierarchy:

  1. home.php – I understand the historic reason why the blog’s main archive is named home.php, but every time I make a new theme, I wonder why such an illogical naming convention still persists. It’s confusing to new users, and simply serves to continue the flawed narrative that the blog is the core of the WordPress experience.
  2. front-page.php overrides page templates – This is particularly frustrating when a parent theme includes a front-page.php file, as there is no way to offer template file choices in the child theme, without modifying the parent.
  3. Custom URL routing is complicated – Sometimes I need a specific url to run my own code, outside of a traditional template file. Often, I’m stuck defining custom rewrite rules and template redirects, or jamming my code into shortcodes and custom templates.

Being a developer. I decided to fix these perceived flaws.

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Misconceptions about Gutenberg are not valid criticism

I am generally seen as a critical voice to WordPress’s Gutenberg editor.  It is true that I feel there are many places where criticism of Gutenberg is valid, such as in timeline, scope of initial releases, and methods of post storage. However, there has been a lot of criticism of Gutenberg recently that is based on misunderstandings or miscommunication of the project goals and the definition of a “block.” To that end, I’m going to try to distill down what the “block” paradigm is all about, and why it is crucial to WordPress’s future. read more »